Does Pain Medication do More Harm than Good?

There is something frustrating about talking to patients who take pain medications and believe in their heart that the drugs are doing them good. We see the advertisement for Alleve that show a woman with arthritis taking Alleve so she can have a better work out. Doctors, when prescribing NSAIDs, impart the idea that the…

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One Inexpensive Way to Reduce the Chance of Developing Arthritis

A prospective cohort study, appearing in Public Health Nutrition (doi: 10.1017/S1368980010001783) looked at osteoarthritis in the knee and the effect of vitamin C supplementation. At the start of the study the 1,023 participants were taking part in the Clearwater Osteoarthritis Study from 1988 to the present. The subjects, all aged 40 or more at the…

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Joint Care and Repair by Joe Buishas (transcribed from recording)

Almost all people over the age of forty have some pathological changes in the weight-bearing joints. The Merck Manualof Diagnosis and Therapy goes on to state that osteoarthritis becomes universal by age 70. Over 22 million people spend over 20 billion dollars each year to relieve their pain and suffering. Knees, hands, wrists, elbows, shoulders,…

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Can Your Hayfever Medication Cause Cancer?

Research published in Science News (1994;145:324) raises the question of whether the antihistamines we take for allergies be linked to cancer. Studies in mice have shown that antihistamines promote the growth of malignant tumors. Scientists at the University of Manitoba believe that the consumption of various medications, including antihistamines and antidepressants, may increase the risk…

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Is Green Tea Good for the Heart?

A study that appeared in Clinical Research in Cardiology (March 10, 2010, epublished), looked at the effect epigallocatechin-3-gallate (also called EGCG, which is an antioxidant extract [polyphenol] from green tea) had on patients with amyloidosis involving the heart. Amyloidosis is a disease that occurs when proteins accumulate abnormally in the organs. Amyloid protein is an…

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Irritable Bowel Syndrome? Maybe it is Your Pain Medication

Research appearing in the American Journal of Gastroenterology (2000;95:157-165) looked at the connection between pain medication and symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A survey was given to 892 adults between the ages of 30 and 64. IBS symptoms were present in 12% of the respondents. The researchers found a significant connection between the use…

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Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Bacteria

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may be due to bacterial overgrowth. Between 11% and 14% of Americans suffer from IBS. An article appearing in the Journal of the American Medical Association (August 18, 2004;292(7):852-858) looked into the possibility of bacteria overgrowth in the small intestine. The lactulose breath test (a way of testing for bacterial overgrowth)…

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Irritable Bowel and Celiac Disease

An article appearing in the journal Gastroenterology (June 2004;126(7):1721-1732) spoke of the connection between celiac disease and irritable bowel syndrome. The article noted that 75% of patients with celiac disease (gluten sensitive enteropathy) had the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (especially when diarrhea is present). Patients with celiac disease often do well on a gluten-free…

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Iodine and Thyroid Function

Iodine is necessary to produce thyroid hormone. A review article appearing in the Lancet (March 28,1998;351:923-924) pointed out the that 1.5 billion people were at risk for brain damage due to lack of iodine. An article in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (1993;77(3):587-591) summarized the health problems brought on by iodine deficiency. These…

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One Nutrient that is Important for Child Development

Research appearing in the Journal of Pediatrics (epublished ahead of print April 12, 2011) looked at the relationship between maternal thyroid function, iodine levels and child development. The level of free thyroxine in the mothers of the children in the study was measured during the first trimester of pregnancy. The 86 children involved in the…

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